Symbols and Emblems of the Olympians

Incorporating symbols and emblems into the design of a mask adds interest, and it also helps the audience identify the character represented. There are many creative ways to include these symbols and emblems in your design--visit the Hall of Masks to see some examples.

Zeus:

All royal symbols, such as crowns and scepters, and the colors gold and purple; also the lightening bolt (his weapon) the golden eagle and the oak tree.

Hera:

Same royal symbols as her husband, Zeus; also the golden cuckoo, peacock, lion and cow (symbol of motherhood).

Poseidon:

All colors and symbols of the ocean, such as seashells and sea creatures, coral, mother-of-pearl, and the colors gray, blue and green; also the trident (his weapon) and the horse.

Hades:

Helmet of Darkness, which made him invisible; Cerberus, his three-headed guard dog; a two-pronged, fork-like staff or scepter; a large key; the cypress tree and the narcissus flower.

Demeter:

All colors and symbols of the harvest, such as various fruit, sheaves of wheat, and all shades of green, gold and russet (reddish-brown); also piglets (her good-luck emblem) and poppies.

Hephaestus:

Fire, and every kind of metal, blacksmith tongs and hammer; also and the quail, a bird that does a hobbling dance in the springtime.

Athena:

The owl, olive tree and the colors white and silver; also her helmet and breastplate (emblazoned with the head of a snake-haired gorgon).

Aphrodite:

Ocean colors, scallop seashells, pearls and green-colored gemstones; also the dove and the myrtle tree.

Ares:

Wild boar and bloodstained spear, also the woodpecker and the vulture.

Apollo:

Sun and lyre (ancient musical instrument); also bow and arrow, serpent (ancient wisdom symbol) and mouse (also wisdom symbol).

Artemis:

New moon, bow and arrow and she-bear (the most dangerous wild animal in ancient Greece).

Hermes:

Winged helmet and sandals (symbols of his swift-thinking and swift-footedness); the caduceus, his staff with either two ribbons or two snakes twined around it; also the crane.

Dionysus:

Ivy wreath, grape vines and clusters of grapes; the thyrsus, a wand made from a fennel stalk twined with ivy and topped with a pine cone; also the tiger.

Hestia:

Fire and hearth.

 

| Back |